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Youth Friendly Services

Young people around the world still face multiple barriers in accessing SRH services and contraception. Operational research was done to understand how we can increase their utilization of services and contraceptives, also among those with special needs?

Need for disabled-friendly SRH-services in Senegal
Many young people with disabilities in Senegal have sexual relations, yet very few use contraceptives or even know how to find SRH services. Young disabled researchers explored the barriers faced by their peers to understand why. Although further research is required, recommendations are made for more effective strategies to increase access to SRHR services for physically, visually and hearing impaired youth.
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Final report
Final report French
Training Presentation
General Presentation

Woman working at pc

Different youths, different needs
Research into factors that enable or hamper access of young people to SRH information and services from formal and informal providers shows major differences between males and females, between married and unmarried young people, and between teenagers (10-19) and older youth (20-24). 
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Final report

Open eyes to youth sexual rights
Service providers and youth workers came together to critically consider what it means to be ‘youth friendly’. In May 2015, they discussed how they could advance young people’s sexual and reproductive health and rights in their work during a six-day workshop in the Ghanaian city of Tamale. What they learnt about young people’s sexual rights and power relations was a real eye-opener.
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Final report
Essential Package Manual
Power walk exercise (page 51/68) 

Youth-friendly services do not automatically attract youth
Do young people more easily access SRH services with an integrated youth corner, a youth oriented centre or regular clinics without special provisions for youth? Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) provides all three types of health care and investigated factors that enhance or inhibit youth’s access to these services. Remarkably, youth-friendly services do not automatically attract youth. 
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Final report

Service uptake among HIV positive youth on the rise 
'Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention’ (PHDP) is a new UN-approved human rights-based policy framework, which helps people living with HIV lead a complete and healthy life and reduce the risk of transmission of the virus to others. In 2014, the Kenyan MAXFACTA Youth Group conducted a study to determine how PHDP principles were translated into existing programmes for young HIV positive people. The results show that HIV positive youth is well informed about the treatment they need and how to find it. Problems such as (the fear of) stigma and discrimination, and not knowing where to go with their concerns or complaints still remain.
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Final report

Youth-friendly focal person makes the difference 
Young Kenyan mothers who live with HIV appear to be well informed about the sexual and reproductive health services to which they are entitled. However, lack of access to these services, either due to an unsupportive family situation or an unprepared health facility, remains a problem. The most successful health facilities are those with an appointed youth-friendly focal person.
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Final report

Peer educators increase uptake of services in Uganda
Six months into the implementation, peer educators were able to increase the uptake of services among young people in two districts in Uganda. In areas where FLEP is implementing the peer educator model there was a twofold increase in use of services among young people. These young people were especially more likely to seek HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) services.   
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Final report

Young HIV mothers need supportive network
Many young HIV-positive mothers in Northern Uganda stop seeking health care for their baby after the first HIV test, especially when the newborn is found to be HIV-negative. Babies exposed to HIV remain at high risk of being infected during their first 18 months. An early diagnosis can save many children’s lives. That is why Mama’s Club tries to keep young HIV-positive mothers within the reach of health facilities, despite the challenges.
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Final report

Discrimination of HIV+ mothers still problematic
Young HIV-positive mothers in Northern Uganda begin to show a more positive attitude towards the health services meant for them. In the areas where Mama’s Club has been active, there is a slight increase in uptake of HIV counselling and testing, and other services to prevent mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT). The biggest hurdles to take on are the on-going discrimination against these women, the lack of support from their partners and the absence of treatment in health facilities.
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Final report

High access to services, low access to decision-making
Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention’ (PHDP) is a new global policy framework that highlights the importance of placing the person living with HIV at the centre of managing their health and wellbeing. Uganda Young Positives, a key network of young people living with HIV, conducted a PHDP baseline study. The study showed that access to SRH services was high among HIV positive youth, but participation in decision-making was very low. 
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Final report

Pakistani youth prefers peers for sexuality information
Young people in Pakistan have many questions about sex and sexuality but most are too shy or too scared to seek a health care provider. Boys turn to their friends, girls to their mothers or sisters. Neither is very keen to consult schoolteachers about sexual health information.
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Final report

Peer educators and midwives make the difference 
SRHR organisations want to know which factors increase the uptake of sexual and reproductive health services among young people. Results in Health aimed to identify these factors through interviewing around 50 young people in and around Yogyakarta. They found that young people only use SRH services when they face a health problem. The actual step to seek help depends on their knowledge and beliefs about this problem. 
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Final report
Presentation