SWOP 2019 Press Release - World must work harder to secure sexual and reproductive rights for all, says new UNFPA report

Rutgers and UNFPA have a long-term partnership. This includes the annual launch of the State of The World Population report. This year's focus is the 'Unfinished Business' and overcoming the barriers that prevent people from fully exercising their sexual and reproductive health and rights.

UNITED NATIONS, New York, 10 April 2019— The global reproductive rights movement that began in the 1960s transformed the lives of hundreds of millions of women, empowering them to govern their own bodies and shape their own futures. But despite the gains made over the past 50 years, since the establishment of UNFPA, the United Nations sexual and reproductive health agency, the world still has a long way to go before rights and choices are claimed by all, according to the State of World Population 2019, released by UNFPA today.  

On the journey towards rights and choices, women and girls have faced social and economic barriers every step of the way. A coalition of civil society, activists, and organizations such as UNFPA have been helping tear down those barriers. 
 
The efforts of the reproductive rights movements have dramatically reduced the number of unintended pregnancies and maternal deaths, and have cleared the way for healthier, more productive lives for untold millions, the new UNFPA report says.  
 
The report traces advances in reproductive health on the anniversaries of two important milestones. It has been 50 years since UNFPA began operations in 1969 as the first United Nations agency to address population growth and reproductive health needs. It is also the 25th anniversary of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), where 179 governments called for all people to have access to comprehensive reproductive health care, including voluntary family planning, and safe pregnancy and childbirth services. 

Much has been achieved since 1969, says the report. The average number of births per woman was 4.8 then, compared to 2.9 in 1994 and 2.5 today; fertility rate in the least developed countries dropped from 6.8 in 1969, to 5.6 in 1994 and 3.9 in 2019; and the number of women who died from pregnancy-related causes has decreased from 369 per 100,000 live births in 1994, to 216 in 2015. In addition, 24 per cent of women used modern contraceptives in 1969, compared to 52 per cent in 1994 and 58 per cent in 2019. However, reproductive rights are still out of reach for too many women, including the more than 200 million women who want to prevent a pregnancy but cannot access modern contraceptive information and services.

Read the full UNFPA Press Release here

Read the State of The World Population 2019 full report here

Read the State of The World Population 2019 Highlight brochure here


For more information, please contact UNFPA in New York:
Omar Gharzeddine: Tel.: +1 212 297 5028; gharzeddine@unfpa.org; or
Richard Kollodge: Tel.: +1 212 297 4992; kollodge@unfpa.org

Read more information on ICPD+25 here

Launch event 

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